The used printing press we purchased had just been delivered and sat forlornly in the middle of our shop floor. Fred Hudson, our plant engineer, just stared at it, one hand on his hip, the other rubbing his bald head.

The riggers who shipped the press deployed a unique method when disassembling the machine. Instead of properly disconnecting the wiring, they simply hacked all the wires off at the power source. So as Fred examined the carnage of tangled wiring, he was trying to figure out how to make all the proper connections. And of course no wiring diagrams or user manuals came with the old, used machine.

Luckily for us, Fred was a genius. He walked around the press for a few days and then pounced. Within a day, he connected all the wires and power was surging through our now running printing press.

Electronics wasn’t the only thing in which Fred was expert. He knew everything about mechanical equipment, building construction, auto mechanics, HVAC, and safety. He was our resident subject matter expert (SME).

Regardless of your type of business  – technology, software, analytics, marketing, healthcare, manufacturing – chances are you have a Fred or two on staff. They are often quiet, unassuming women and men who harbor a vast source of knowledge of your industry and company. That makes them an invaluable resource when it comes to creating content to help market your business. Whether you need a white paper, eBook, case study, blog post, or sell sheet, your SME’s can provide the knowledge and insight to make your content pieces relevant and compelling.

Here are four ways to get the most out of your SME’s when it comes to content creation.

Tap into their passion

Regardless of how quiet and reserved your SME’s may be, they will open up if you can get them talking about something in the business they are passionate about. They carry around a ton of knowledge they rarely get a chance to share. Showing genuine interest and tapping into that passion often results in a treasure trove of valuable and compelling information that will interest your customers and prospects.

Be thorough in your interview

To get really good information from your SME’s, be fully prepared for your discussion. Ask open ended questions and listen closely. Follow up and probe to get them to dig deeper. If the subject is particularly complicated, try to strip away the jargon and get them to explain in plan English. Oftentimes, SME’s are so well versed in a topic, they forget that we mere mortals may not have any idea what they are talking about. Fred used to start most discussions with “As you know…” before going on to talk about something about which I was totally clueless. Don’t be embarrassed to say “I don’t understand. Can you please explain?” Have your SME use analogies to further clarify the subject to make it easier to convert your conversation into meaningful content.

Record the discussion

Before you begin, ask for permission to record the conversation. Even if you are master at shorthand – something very few people are these days – you’ll never capture all the content gold your SME will share. They may be intimidated at first, but once you get them talking they will usually forget they are being recorded. Having a digital record of the conversation will be invaluable later when you parse the discussion into various pieces of content.

Keep them in the loop

As you convert their words of wisdom into blog posts, ebooks, or white papers, make sure you keep them involved. Let them review anything you write before publishing. This will not only reinforce that you appreciate what they had to say, it will also ensure that you haven’t misinterpreted something or simply made some errors of fact. Keeping them involved will demonstrate that you truly care about what they had to say and will also make it easier if you decide to go back to them for more interesting content later.

As you put your content schedule together and scramble to do research, don’t look past your internal resources. Engage your SME’s and enjoy a bountiful content reward.

How do you use the knowledge of your SME’s? What forms of content have you been able to put together with their help?